BLADDER

BLADDER

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According to statistics from The Continence Foundation of Australia, 4 million Australians suffer from urinary leakage. ¬† 1 in 3 women who have ever had a baby will have this problem at some stage in their life.¬† But his is not just a ‚Äúwomen‚Äôs problem‚ÄĚ.¬† Men also experience this problem most commonly related to prostate surgery.¬† But whatever the cause or reason or associated medical condition, help is available for any of these problems:

  • Stress urinary incontinence: the problem of leakage with exercise,¬†coughing, sneezing, moving suddenly, lifting. It can be very mild but may progress to a severe loss requiring pad use.
  • Urge urinary incontinence: the problem of leakage ¬†associated with strong desire to pass urine which is difficult to defer. ¬†You may find yourself rushing to the toilet but won’t make it in time. This problem usually progresses over a long period. If urgency and frequency comes on suddenly it could be a urinary tract infection and you should see your G.P. or Physio to guide you.
  • Difficulty emptying:¬†You may feel that you don’t empty your bladder properly. ¬† You may just need to go often and need to go again¬†too soon after emptying. ¬†It may be that the bladder does not empty properly. ¬†A quick look is possible in rooms with Ultrasound. You come in with a full bladder, empty and we can measure what is left in the bladder. ¬†Your G.P would send you for a more formal Ultrasound study.
  • Frequency and urgency:¬†You may experience urgency and frequency but not have any leakage. ¬†If it BOTHERS you then its a problem worth addressing. Fear of leakage is often the reason why people change their bladder habits, start to empty “just in case” and more frequently.
  • Bladder prolapse or ‚Äúanterior wall prolapse‚ÄĚ.¬† Also ¬†still sometimes called ‚Äúcystocoele‚ÄĚ: prolapse is common in women who have delivered a baby via normal vaginal delivery. ¬†It can also occur for those with chronic cough, those who do heavy lifting and¬†those who are overweight. It can be very uncomfortable and cause a dragging sensation or heaviness¬†in the vagina.
  • Before and after pelvic organ surgery:¬† After a hysterectomy, you need to exercise the pelvic floor to prevent prolapse of the bladder or bowel later in life. ¬†After prolapse surgery itself, you need to exercise the pelvic floor and learn how to USE those muscles in daily life to prevent re-prolapse. ¬†You will need to exercise to prevent having surgery AGAIN, later in life ( a horrible thought!)
  • Before and after prostatectomy:¬†Men have pelvic floor muscles just like women.¬†¬†These muscles, along with¬†a special “sphincter’ of muscles around the urethra (bladder tube), need to be¬†strengthened so that men can regain bladder control easily after the prostate has been removed. During the operation, part of the bladder’s natural closing mechanism is¬†removed. ¬† This is why you will need your¬†pelvic floor muscles after the operation. ¬†Most men are surprised at what little effort is needed to exercise the pelvic floor. ¬†Once learnt, these exercises will be easy throughout life to help you maintain bladder control.